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Research Overview

Capita Foundation is a nonprofit organization that funds hearing research scientists with micro-grants to innovate. Our seed grants encourage researchers to think outside the box and explore fearlessly in prevention and cure of hearing disorders. Over the past decade of micro-grants our Capita awardees have averaged a 10 fold return with subsequent [NIH, NSF, etc] funding.

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CAPITA FOUNDATION - NEWS and EVENTS


CFAR Grant Application Deadline Extention

Attention all Research Grant Applicants

Due to difficulty applicants have recently had with our email system, please be advised that we are extending the deadline to submit applications till end of day June 15, 2016

Sincerely,

Robert Capita, President/CEO
Capita Foundation

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**ATTENTION ALL RESEARCH GRANT APPLICANTS**

PLEASE NOTE THAT CAPITA FOUNDATION'S EMAIL info@capitafoundation.org HAS RECENTLY BEEN COMROMISED AND WE HAVE HAD DIFFICULTY RECEIVING GRANT APPLICATIONS.  PLEASE CALL 619-849-9850 TO REQUEST AN ALTERNATE EMAIL ADDRESS. 


We are currently working to resolve this technical issue, we look forward to reviewing your 2016 CFAR grant application and thank you for your understanding.

Sincerely,

Robert Capita, President/CEO
Capita Foundation


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Announcing 2015 Capita Foundation Auditory Research (CFAR) grant award recipients

Amanda Lauer, Ph.D.

Johns Hopkins University, Dept. of Otolaryngology


  




Project Title: “Optimizing hearing with top-down brain control of the ear.”  





Project Description

The overall goal of my research is to understand how auditory input from the ear affects the brain, and how the brain in turn affects the ear through efferent feedback loops. I am particularly interested in understanding the hearing disorders that develop when input to and from the brain is altered. We propose to study top-down efferent effects on hearing to understand how the brain controls the ear using optogenetic, behavioral, and immunohistochemical techniques in rodent models. Understanding how these pathways work may open up new treatment avenues for hearing disorders and will help us understand how hearing is optimized by top-down brain control of cochlear activity.


Medial (MOC) and lateral olivocochlear (LOC) neurons project from the brain to the ear and control information sent back to the brain. Adapted from Lauer et al. (2012). Neurobiology of Aging.


Sanjee Abeytunge

The Rockefeller University

Project Title:  "A Novel Micro-probe for Direct Stimulation of Cochlear Hair Cells




The ear is the fastest and most sensitive sensory organ in the human body. It can resolve data a thousand times faster than the eye and can detect vibrations in the environment at the atomic-scale. The dynamic range of human hearing embraces up to 120 dB of sound-pressure level (SPL). This dynamic range allows humans to hear a millionfold range of amplitudes. The frequency response of a human ear extends to 20 kHz while other mammals, such as whales and bats, can hear up to hundreds of kilohertz. However, the current stimulation probes of hair cells in the cochlea, the sense organ of the ear, to study the mechanics of the inner ear is limited to less than 1 kHz. This limitation leaves most of the mammalian auditory frequencies unstudied. This experimental limitation is due to the physical dimensions of the probes and their configurations used during experiments. My work is design and construction of a micrometer scale novel probe that will overcome the current frequency limitation.




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A World Without Barriers
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With no more than a month of planning, Muharram became the center of an extraordinary stunt. Take a look below to see how Samsung heart-warmingly created a "World with no barriers".

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